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06.05.09

Bank Barn Renovation Update

I thought I’d share some photos of the ongoing renovation of the bank barn project in Ohio. The last time I wrote, the barn–which is being converted into a guest house–had just been relocated to a new position on the site in order to maximize views. (An important feature considering the extensive porch/decking that will outfit the rear of the barn.)

Recently, the crew installed SIPS panels on the roof and walls to insulate the barn without compromising the old barn’s interior. The exterior of the SIPS were then clad in reclaimed barn wood to give the exterior the same “old barn” feel as the interior while still providing the owner with the modern comforts expected in today’s homes. The original slate shingle was carefully removed and replaced with SIPS attached to the original roof boards. We never anticipated reusing all of the original slate, for fear that too much of it would break, but I’m happy to report that– in the end– no new slate was needed.

A lot of care has gone into maintaining and restoring the original character of the barn including the replication of the original rafter tails and the thin profile of the roof overhang. The four louver windows on the front and rear of the building were replicated as well as the large (soon-to-be-louvered) windows at both gabled ends. The louvers at the front and rear are hinged like an old fashion shutter, concealing the operable, double hung low-e windows. The large barn doors at the front can close across the entire window wall and entrance for maximum privacy or security.

The next phase will complete the interior work (including the grand fireplace that is a centerpiece of the large open living area) and construct the porch and decking at the rear of the barn.

Exterior of the Bank BarnInterior of the Bank Barn

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05.10.09

Sagamore Farm

One of our recent projects, Sagamore Farm, was written about in the May 10, 2009 issue of the Baltimore Sun. The article details the owner’s plans to revitalize the thoroughbred racing industry in Maryland.

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05.06.09

The Rosemount Center

One of Blackburn’s projects, The Rosemount Center, was in the news when actress Jennifer Garner visited the daycare and preschool facility to read and visit with students. The center was also recently honored by the Historic Mount Pleasant for the restoration.

The Rosemount Center

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04.27.09

Blackburn greenbarns: visit our new Web site!

In recognition of Earth Day, my firm announced a new division in design called Blackburn greenbarns. Starting with four ready-to-build horse-barn designs, we hope these barns are an affordable alternative to custom design. Of course, as the name implies, all the designs are green–in three ways: through passive design solutions, green materials and finishes, and additional design services to implement green systems such as solar panels. 

I’d love to hear your thoughts about greenbarns and our new Web site at www.blackburngreenbarns.com. Please visit it and let us know what you think!

John

We call this model "The Hickory." It is designed for warm climates to provide natural cooling and ventilation

We call this model "The Hickory." It is designed for warm climates to provide natural cooling and ventilation

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01.28.09

The Effects of the Recession: Share Your Experiences

Readers,

I’d really like to hear from you. The recent economic outlook is dismal. It seems I read a new piece of bad news each and every day. Like Monday’s article from the New York Times reporting 62,000 more announced layoffs across the nation and around the world. It seems that it’s going to get worse before it gets better, unfortunately. As reported by CBS News, President Obama “pledged a recovery plan ‘that is equal to the task ahead.'”  

I just listened to a seminar by an economist for the Association of General Contractors (AGC). The seminar depicts that though the beginning of a turn around is forecasted by late summer or fall of this year, state and municipal budget may economically lag behind because they have to operate from revenues generated– and the economy has to turn around before that can happen. That is, unless the stimulus package provides funding for state public projects. But any jolt to the economy soon will have positive results, in my opinion. Beggars can’t be choosers, right?

On a more optimistic note, we continue to receive calls from some clients who are interested in getting their projects designed and “shovel ready,” so they can take advantage of the low building costs before the “turn around,” and before increased building costs are expected to occur.  The economist for the AGC predicts lower costs in some construction categories of -4 to 0% range for 2009 and price spikes of 6 to 8% in 2010.

To many, this may seem impossible to even consider. To others, I hope this may be a piece of good news in an otherwise dreary situation.

Please write to me and let me know how you’ve been affected by these conditions. What have you had to scale back on? Do you feel optimistic? 

John

To feel free

To feel free

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08.13.08

Site Visit in South Carolina: New Stalls

A few weeks ago, Cesar, one of our project managers, and I went to Meggett, South Carolina for a site visit. We planned our visit to review the ten recently completed stalls added to an existing ten-stall barn on the property. Soon, the barn will also have a larger tack room and lounge.  In the next phase of work, our design plans include adding a full-ridge skylight across the length of the barn to maximize natural light as well as improve ventilation.

Upon our visit, two things struck us: the humidity and the regal old oak trees with Spanish moss scattered across the property that provide ample and much-needed shade (and, of course, natural beauty and Southern charm).  Otherwise, the 63-acre property set in South Carolina’s Low Country is relatively flat with large and open grassy paddocks.

This project required expedited design and construction, since the client had to move her horses across the country before the end of the month and the stalls had to be ready before their arrival. This timeline left our team less than a month to undertake concept design to completion of construction.  And, thanks to the efforts of Jack Hart and Jimmy Thompson of Advanced Construction, Corbin, KY, who put in overtime and weekend hours, in conjunction with extremely fast turnaround by stall systems production at Lucas Equine, the stalls were installed quickly and efficiently.  Given the heat and humidity, this was no small feat.

The property also has an existing 1-story residence, garage with apartment, small outdoor arena, and several existing paddocks. Future design plans include the addition of a riding field, 4-stall foaling barn, pool with pool house, round pen, covered arena, and hay/bedding storage.

Here’s a video of the new stalls, now home to some very grateful horses.

[googlevideo=http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8445301395594592376&hl=en]

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08.04.08

Keep Your Horses Safe: H.R. 6598, The Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act of 2008

Greetings equestrians and welcome to my Blog dedicated to the care and shelter of horses. While my expertise is the architectural design of equestrian facilities, I am part of the larger community of horse lovers dedicated to the humane treatment of horses and all animals. It is in that spirit that I’d like to call your attention to important legislation that is currently under consideration in the U.S. House of Representatives written to prevent the cruelty inherent in the horse slaughter industry.

As horse lovers who give the greatest care to your animals, you may not realize that despite the fact that the last horse slaughter factory in the U.S. was closed in 2007, that there is still a market for the transport of horses across our borders to Canada and Mexico for slaughter for horsemeat. I was surprised to learn that there were still horse slaughter facilities in our country as recently as last year and stunned to know that horse for horse, the same number of horses are now finding their way across our borders for slaughter.

The transport of horses across long distances in extreme temperatures simply adds to the degree of cruelty inherent in the horsemeat industry. According to Representative John Conyers, Democrat from Michigan, and Representative Dan Burton, Republican from Indiana, authors of H.R. 6598, The Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act of 2008, amends a previous section of U.S. Code that prohibits cruelty of animals for financial gain. That code, Chapter 3 of Title 18 of U.S. Code, resulted in the closure of the last horse slaughterhouse in the U.S. just last year. However, it didn’t anticipate that the market for American horses for slaughter would simply move across the borders to Canada and Mexico therefore increasing the suffering of horses destined for slaughter.

The new law specifically prohibits the transport of horses for slaughter and specifies punishment stringent enough to be effective. I hope you’ll join me in supporting the legislation—let your representative know that you think this is a crucial step to take to ensure the humane treatment of American horses. Here is a link to a form letter written by the Humane Society of the U.S. to make speaking out on behalf of horses as easy as possible:

If you’re interested in an eye-opening, in-depth history of the consumption of horsemeat, you should see the March 2008 issue of Horse Connection Magazine. Editor Geoff Young shined the light on this American taboo.

Please let me know what you think about this important issue.

Posted in Equestrian News | | 9 comments >
08.01.08

Equestrians: Write me with your Design Questions!

Hello Equestrians,

I really hope you’re enjoying my new stable-minded blog. It’s here to help provide a professional source of information, to be a place to exchange design ideas, address barn problems, discuss the ways an architect can impact horse health and safety, and to help guide you to sustainable choices in the design of your facility.  Equestrian structures can go green with cost-effective design choices. For example, there are many options for preserving, restoring and adapting old barns to new uses. You might be interested in a project we did a few years ago that converted a 150-year-old bank barn into a guesthouse. 

This 1800s bank barn was converted to a "party barn."

This 1800s bank barn was converted to a "party barn."

I have been thinking green throughout my career and would love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Let me hear from you. What do you think? How is your barn working or not working? Let me know what’s on your mind.

Looking forward to hearing from you.

John    

 

 

 

 

Posted in Equestrian News, Sustainable Design | | 4 comments >