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12.14.10

Lucky Jack Ranch in Rancho Santa Fe – Southern California Dreamin’

Just over a year ago, I wrote about visiting a project in Rancho Santa Fe, California that had just began construction. A year later, I am happy to report that the construction effort is complete and was a great success. Lucky Jack Ranch, as its owners have christened it, is located in Rancho Santa Fe California and is made up of a 3,900 sq. ft. clubhouse with guest residence, a 15-stall barn plus a large wash stall, six outdoor tacking stalls, and an open riding arena. The Ranch also has a famous neighbor: the Pacific Ocean.

The family’s private equestrian facilities take full advantage of seven acres of the site, with the structures placed upon an overlook to capture Pacific Ocean breezes, not to mention an ideal view of the sunset. The Ranch emphasizes the leisurely aspects of horse riding, from cool-down trails surrounding the property to a large patio that invites riders to relax and socialize after riding. There’s a romantic feel to the architecture, which was designed as a modern tribute to Lilian J. Rice, the architect responsible for much of the site planning and architectural design within the community of Rancho Santa Fe as it formed around 1922. The architecture is heavily influenced by Spanish and Spanish Colonial design, using stucco, terra cotta, and wood accents. A trellis stretches from the clubhouse to the barn to connect the Ranch visually.

The property focuses on an ultimate rider experience, apparent in the full amenities at Lucky Jack (there’s even a wood burning pizza oven), but there’s no mistaking that this is a serious working horse ranch; complete with a hotwalker, round pen, custom Lucas Equine stall systems that include indoor and outdoor wash stalls, a tack room, and several areas for riders to lounge and observe the activity of fellow riders.

A fully equipped kitchen and dining area in the clubhouse opens to a smaller, more intimate patio space for dining al fresco while the main patio (with that enviable, wood burning pizza oven I mentioned) prompts larger gatherings. Lounge chairs and tables invite riders and non-riders alike to relax and take in the refreshing ocean breezes and unwind. The owner’s family and friends can even stay in the clubhouse, which has two bedrooms, terraces, and a laundry room. The only real difficulty might be getting guests to leave.

[slideshow]

Allard Jansen Architects, Inc. of San Diego was a local design consultant and permit facilitator for the project.

Posted in Equestrian News | | 2 comments >
12.08.10

Re-Use Architecture by Chris van Uffelen – Braun Publishing

We just received a copy of Chris van Uffelen‘s new book called Re-Use Architecture from the German publishing house, Braun. This substantial book highlights adaptive reuse projects throughout the world: Blackburn’s New River Bank Barn project is part of the stunning collection.

As van Uffelen asserts, building conversion is more relevant than ever as recycled and eco-friendly solutions are becoming the norm. It’s a gratifying challenge for me to “save” an old barn or convert a worn out structure into something different while paying respect to its former use. I can’t help but appreciate a book that makes showing off these type of projects a mission.

We’ve been fortunate to have received attention for the New River Bank Barn, which was a memorable and exciting project for our firm. I still can’t help but feel proud when I look at the “before” photo of the 1800s bank barn, which was in severe disrepair. Most of the structure was preserved, but re-clad in SIPs panels to provide insulation and structural support. The SIPs panels are sandwiched between the original barn walls and a new board-and-batten exterior. The northeast-facing wall of the original structure was removed entirely and glazed, opening the interior to expansive (and very private) views of the property to the Potomac River. Steel columns were added and wrapped in indigenous fieldstone to support the new glass wall, which was designed with mullions that align with the original frame columns and purlins so that the framework fits aesthetically with the original structure.

Our work could only be done thanks to the owner’s foresight to envision a new future for the old structure. I couldn’t be more pleased to have been given the opportunity to “save” the bank barn, which now hosts gatherings and parties for the owner’s friends and family. Re-Use Architecture is available at Amazon and major book retailers.

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12.01.10

Facebook Page

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11.16.10

New River Bank Barn in Re-Use Architecture

New River Bank Barn is a part of Re-Use Architecture, a collection of adaptive reuse projects designed by architects (and in locations) across the globe. The selected project salvaged an 1800s bank barn in Leesburg, Virginia, converting it into a “party barn” for its owners to host gatherings of friends and family. Re-Use Architecture by Chris van Uffelen is available from the German publishing house, Braun, and can be purchased through Amazon and other major book retailers.

Re-Use Architecture

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11.05.10

Completed Project – A Final Update on Family Farm in Marshall, Virginia

A few weeks ago, some of my staff and I were able to tour one of our recently completed projects, a new horse barn, arena, and residence (for which we did some renovations) in Marshall, Virginia. Marshall is located in the Northern Virginia piedmont, just outside of the well-known horse communities of Middleburg and Upperville. With beautiful, sloping land, the area is home to several farms, vineyards, and country homes.

The 8-stall barn has a lounge with an office on the second floor and an attached arena for the owner to practice dressage. I’m very pleased with how the new facilities have turned out and hope the owners are too. For more information on the scope of work, please see my previous post. [slideshow]

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10.12.10

The American Horse Council: A Free Tax Seminar in VA

I’d like to pass along the following information from The American Horse Council for my Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC area readers.

The American Horse Council will be hosting a FREE Tax Seminar featuring Tad Davis on Thursday November 4, 2010 at 6 p.m. at the Tri-County Feeds in Marshall, VA.  This is an open invitation, so feel free to share it with other members of the horse industry so they can learn how current federal tax laws affect them and their equine businesses.  Please see the attached invitation for more details.

This invitation is also posted on the AHC website, so feel free to visit the Events Page on the AHC website for information.  We are asking that anyone that plans to attend please RSVP so w e can have an estimate of how many people to expect.   Please direct all RSVPs to Bridget Harrison at bharrison@horsecouncil.org or 202.296.4031.

TaxSeminarVA

 

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09.27.10

Washington Humane Society – Walk for the Animals

Some of my staff attended this year’s Walk for the Animals, an annual dog walk hosted by the Washington Humane Society. The walk encourages DC-area dog owners to take their dog (and themselves) for a stroll around one of DC’s neighborhoods to help raise awareness for the Humane Society.

With the weather in the low 90s on Saturday, I’m sure there was quite a bit of panting and lapping up water! Still, there were (doggie) rewards: vendor handouts such as ice cream and baked goods made especially for our four-legged friends.

Project Manager Daniel Blair, Lisa LaFontaine of the Washington Humane Society, and Ellie Jester (plus Frida, Heine, and Happy)

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09.22.10

Monticule Farm: Lexington, KY

Originally on a 200-acre parcel of lush green rolling hills in Kentucky horse country between Layette and Bourbon Counties, Monticule Farm was named for the French word for a small mountain. Blackburn Architects worked with famed landscape architect Morgan Wheelock to develop the property, now over 600-acres, into one of the industry’s best commercial breeding facilities. Blackburn designed a 20-stall broodmare barn and a 16-stall yearling barn in the style of other large Kentucky horse farms from the 1940s. In 2008, Blackburn provided master plan and concept design services for a four barn stallion complex; each barn contains four stalls. This project was featured in Keeneland Magazine.

Program 16-stall yearling barn and 20-stall broodmare barn

Completion 2000 (broodmare and yearling barns); 2008 (stallion complex)

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09.07.10

Charles Town Races Fire

From Ray Paulick’s blog, the Paulick Report comes some very sad news; three barns were destroyed and at least 27 horses are confirmed dead after a Labor Day fire at the Charles Town Races in Charles Town, West Virginia. The cause of the fire is not yet reported, but the Washington Post says the damage is estimated at $1.2 million and several of the horses were worth at least $10,000.

A couple years ago, I wrote a post about preventing barn fires– I thought I’d share it again. Accidents will happen, unfortunately, but there are several ways to help ensure the safety of your horses. My thoughts are with those affected by the tragedy at Charles Town Races.

FIRE SAFETY AND WHAT YOU CAN DO:

Often owners ask about designing sprinklers in barns or to frame the barn in steel to make it more “fireproof.” However, by the time the construction estimates come in, those seem to be the first items cut. Though both are credible for preventing fire, I like to design using preventive care so sprinklers or steel framing are not the only means of fire protection. (Incidentally, a steel frame building, if left unprotected, can collapse due to fire or heat from the fire before a heavy timber framed structure. But, as many of you know, the smoke from the fire kills long before the actual flames.)

Hopefully these suggestions can help you—and your horses—sleep a little better at night.

COMBUSTABLES:

Hay is a huge fire hazard because of the dust it accumulates, especially when stored in a traditional hayloft setting. While I’ve designed barns with a full hayloft, I urge clients to consider a separate storage facility for hay and bedding or, at least, create a partial loft that does not span the barn’s entire length and isolate the storage area with fire walls. While fire walls may not be as effective as a fire rated partition (which is expensive), the fire wall can contain smoke and fire for enough time to alert help remove the horses. If neither option is possible, keep hay in a fire-rated enclosure.

If a hay loft is required, there are some precautions that can reduce the risk of fire, such as the choice of frame; an effective choice can reduce opportunities for bird nests and cobwebs, especially around lights, and provide natural light to reduce the need for electric lights.

VERTICAL VENTILATION AND HEATERS:

In my ideal hay storage structure, a separate storage facility for hay and bedding is designed to generate vertical ventilation, similar to a well-designed barn. To do this, I take advantage of the storage structure’s large roof to capture solar energy, which heats the air inside the structure along with the heat from the curing hay. Air accumulates at the ceiling while cooler air flows at floor level, forming a vertical flow of air. Skylight vents release the warmer air and let cooler air inside. This constant flow of air supplies superior ventilation without the use of expensive or energy-burning equipment that can cause a spark or short.

Some horse owners stand behind their use of heaters in stalls, but I find it unnecessary and risky. Ideally, the inside of a barn should reflect a similar temperature to outside. After all, horses are born to survive in the wild, not confined in a stall. Because of their sensitive respiratory systems, a well-ventilated barn is a horse’s best defense.

A heated (or air conditioned), enclosed barn not only retains ammonia gases and pathogens that cause odor and disease, it creates conditions that require gas fired heaters and mechanical fans for circulation, each of which is a potential fire risk, not to mention expensive to maintain and operate. That’s why designing for ventilation is such an emphasis in my work.

Typically, if a barn is heated it is done for the sake of the staff, not the horses, and should be confined to human areas only. This should be considered an added luxury, but if requested, a heated aisle floor is the safest method. A horse that is permitted to develop a winter coat can handle temperatures as low as zero degrees Fahrenheit.For lower temperatures, blankets can usually maintain warmth without being a fire hazard.

FIRE SEPARATION DOORS:

I like to use fire walls and isolation doors to aid in the protection of fire or smoke generated by a fire. Though a fire rated fire separation may not be practical in most barns, you can create fire separations within the barn to isolate certain areas or uses from other areas of the barn especially the stalls.

OUTLETS AND WIRES:

Always use UL-rated fixtures and properly installed electrical fixtures and fittings. All wiring should be in metal sheath conduit such as solid conduit or BX type cables, even in concealed areas because of mice and other small animals that inhabit barns. Consider explosion proof outlets and switches, and protect all lights with shatterproof lenses or wire cages. Set up a maintenance routine to clean all light fixtures periodically (for fire risk concerns but also for energy concerns, i.e. a dirty light is much less efficient that a clean one that is otherwise identical.

OTHER SUGGESTIONS:

· Fire extinguishers throughout

· Fire retardant building materials (use heavy timber in lieu of light wood or truss framing when possible or affordable).

· Design Dutch doors where possible to the exterior, as they are better for ventilation and helpful for getting the horse—and people—out in case of emergency. Make sure the doors can be operated from interior and exterior.

· Separate living spaces (apartments) from barn where possible or at least placed behind fire separations.

· Separate farrier services when possible.

· Never store motorized equipment within the barn, but if you do, isolate it behind fire separations or separate areas.  (A barn burned in Northern Virginia a few years ago simply because someone cranked up a lawn mower that backfired, setting a nearby bale of hay on fire.)

· Install an effective fire alarm system (preferably one that is monitored by a 24-hour service) and plan an emergency evacuation route.

FINAL WORD:

I worked with the Grosse Point Hunt Club years ago after they suffered a barn fire and lost over 20 horses, as I recall. I believe the fire was caused when a firecracker was thrown into the barn simply for mischief, resulting in a tragic loss of animal life and property. That was an older barn that had very little fire protection “designed” into it.

Regardless of how much protection you design into a barn, no system is perfect. Still, much can be done to protect older barns from fire and reduce the hazards. We often work with existing barns to modernize their operation and look, while doing everything we can to protect the health and safety of the horse—whether from fire, bad ventilation, or other unsafe conditions.

If you have any other recommendations to prevent fire, please let me know. As always, I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

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