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12.14.10

Lucky Jack Ranch in Rancho Santa Fe – Southern California Dreamin’

Just over a year ago, I wrote about visiting a project in Rancho Santa Fe, California that had just began construction. A year later, I am happy to report that the construction effort is complete and was a great success. Lucky Jack Ranch, as its owners have christened it, is located in Rancho Santa Fe California and is made up of a 3,900 sq. ft. clubhouse with guest residence, a 15-stall barn plus a large wash stall, six outdoor tacking stalls, and an open riding arena. The Ranch also has a famous neighbor: the Pacific Ocean.

The family’s private equestrian facilities take full advantage of seven acres of the site, with the structures placed upon an overlook to capture Pacific Ocean breezes, not to mention an ideal view of the sunset. The Ranch emphasizes the leisurely aspects of horse riding, from cool-down trails surrounding the property to a large patio that invites riders to relax and socialize after riding. There’s a romantic feel to the architecture, which was designed as a modern tribute to Lilian J. Rice, the architect responsible for much of the site planning and architectural design within the community of Rancho Santa Fe as it formed around 1922. The architecture is heavily influenced by Spanish and Spanish Colonial design, using stucco, terra cotta, and wood accents. A trellis stretches from the clubhouse to the barn to connect the Ranch visually.

The property focuses on an ultimate rider experience, apparent in the full amenities at Lucky Jack (there’s even a wood burning pizza oven), but there’s no mistaking that this is a serious working horse ranch; complete with a hotwalker, round pen, custom Lucas Equine stall systems that include indoor and outdoor wash stalls, a tack room, and several areas for riders to lounge and observe the activity of fellow riders.

A fully equipped kitchen and dining area in the clubhouse opens to a smaller, more intimate patio space for dining al fresco while the main patio (with that enviable, wood burning pizza oven I mentioned) prompts larger gatherings. Lounge chairs and tables invite riders and non-riders alike to relax and take in the refreshing ocean breezes and unwind. The owner’s family and friends can even stay in the clubhouse, which has two bedrooms, terraces, and a laundry room. The only real difficulty might be getting guests to leave.

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Allard Jansen Architects, Inc. of San Diego was a local design consultant and permit facilitator for the project.

Posted in Equestrian News | | 2 comments >
12.08.10

Re-Use Architecture by Chris van Uffelen – Braun Publishing

We just received a copy of Chris van Uffelen‘s new book called Re-Use Architecture from the German publishing house, Braun. This substantial book highlights adaptive reuse projects throughout the world: Blackburn’s New River Bank Barn project is part of the stunning collection.

As van Uffelen asserts, building conversion is more relevant than ever as recycled and eco-friendly solutions are becoming the norm. It’s a gratifying challenge for me to “save” an old barn or convert a worn out structure into something different while paying respect to its former use. I can’t help but appreciate a book that makes showing off these type of projects a mission.

We’ve been fortunate to have received attention for the New River Bank Barn, which was a memorable and exciting project for our firm. I still can’t help but feel proud when I look at the “before” photo of the 1800s bank barn, which was in severe disrepair. Most of the structure was preserved, but re-clad in SIPs panels to provide insulation and structural support. The SIPs panels are sandwiched between the original barn walls and a new board-and-batten exterior. The northeast-facing wall of the original structure was removed entirely and glazed, opening the interior to expansive (and very private) views of the property to the Potomac River. Steel columns were added and wrapped in indigenous fieldstone to support the new glass wall, which was designed with mullions that align with the original frame columns and purlins so that the framework fits aesthetically with the original structure.

Our work could only be done thanks to the owner’s foresight to envision a new future for the old structure. I couldn’t be more pleased to have been given the opportunity to “save” the bank barn, which now hosts gatherings and parties for the owner’s friends and family. Re-Use Architecture is available at Amazon and major book retailers.

Posted in Equestrian News, Sustainable Design | | Leave a comment >
07.28.10

Project Update: Construction Progress of California Ranch

One of our project managers, Dan, traveled to California last week to check in on the construction progress at Lucky Jack Ranch in Rancho Santa Fe. The last time I blogged about the project—about 8 months ago—the construction was just underway and where it was headed may of been difficult to visualize.

I’m now happy to report that visualization is no longer necessary to gauge the progress of this project, which will wrap up construction before we know it. Personally, I find it hard to believe the following photo isn’t a rendering. I’ll include the rendering too so you can compare for yourself. I hope the owners are as pleased as I am with how their project is turning out and that they will be able to enjoy the new facilities very soon.

Rendering of the project, Lucky Jack Ranch

Photo of the construction progress as of July 2010

Posted in Equestrian News | | 1 comment >
05.04.10

Barn Party Deux at Ketchen Place Farm: Some Photos

I posted these photos on our Facebook Page (so many social mediums, so little time!), but want to put them here as well. Blogging is my method of choice, in any case.

Over the weekend, some of my staff and I had the opportunity to visit our friends at Ketchen Place Farm, a Blackburn project in Rock Hill, South Carolina. The farm is located just south of Charlotte, North Carolina, and is simply beautiful this time of year. Ketchen is family-owned and family-run, and they couldn’t be a nicer or more generous group of folks. I’d sincerely like to thank each and every one of them for their hospitality and for inviting us to join the festivities. I’d also like to thank them for asking me to give a short speech about the barn and its design—while I could go on and on about barn designs and this project in particular, I tried to keep it short and sweet.

The party was a tribute to the new barn, a couple of birthdays, an anniversary, the Kentucky Derby, and the birth of a new foal. To celebrate, there were plenty of Derby-hat wearers, equestrians of all ages, friends, family, and the stabled horses at Ketchen. It was really nice to hear the family talk about the history of Ketchen (it’s been in the family since the 1800s), watch a jumping demonstration by a young rider, walk around the barn, and ooh and ahh over the adorable foal.

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04.08.10

Feedback Requested: Horse Barns and Equestrian Design

Hello Readers,

At the Blackburn office, we’ve been busy developing Blackburn Greenbarns®, a line of pre-designed barns that are sustainable, provide a healthy and safe atmosphere for horses, and are more affordable than custom design. We first introduced this line of barns last April, but the overall construction costs for the barns were a little higher than we would have liked. So, we decided to go back to the drawing board (literally) in an attempt to streamline the process without compromising our values. We are almost ready to relaunch Blackburn Greenbarns® (with a new and improved website on its way!) with a “kit barn” option, but I would really love to hear from you as far as what’s most important to you when building a new barn.

I know that cost is a huge factor—as it should be—for most barn owners. However, I also know that being a horse owner is quite an investment in and of itself—and that most owners just want a facility that protects their horses when they are in the barn, knowing full well that the horses would rather be lazing about in the paddocks.

What is the most important factor when building a new barn? Affordability? What about the style or look of the barn? Are you interested in sustainable products or incorporating green design?

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I hope you’ll comment on this post and share your thoughts. Maybe there’s something that all the barn builders (or architects) forget to include/consider and it drives you nuts? Or maybe there’s a particular service (like site planning) that you’d find valuable but aren’t sure you can afford or truly need and would like to know more about it.

Hope to hear from you! More on what we’ve been up to soon.

Posted in Equestrian News, Sustainable Design | | Leave a comment >
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