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05.23.11

Sagamore Farm: The Washington Post & The New York Times

Blackburn Architects is so grateful to be a part of Kevin Plank’s dream to revitalize the horse racing industry in Maryland through his work at Sagamore Farm in Glyndon. We hope you’ll enjoy these articles from The Washington Post and The New York Times about Mr. Plank’s impressive ambitions for the historic farm and to elevate Maryland’s racing industry clout. We believe that if anyone can do it, it’s Mr. Plank. Congratulations to the whole team at Sagamore Farm, whose All Mettle won Pimlico’s $30,000 maiden special weight race in only her second career start!

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03.28.11

Ventilation: Fresh, Healthy Stables

I wanted to share an oldie but goodie – an article I wrote originally for Western Horseman Magazine about designing for natural ventilation within your barn. This stuff is the bread and butter of our design, in that no matter where a barn is located, or what a client’s budget may be, healthy and natural ventilation within the stables is our priority. Read the article, Breath of Fresh Air, and let me know what you think.

From our first barns at Heronwood Farm in 1983, designing for healthy ventilation remains our top priority.

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01.19.11

ReSource 7: My Vote for Free Green’s Design Contest

I’m always proud to watch Blackburn designers excel in their work, even after leaving the firm. That’s why I have to share that one of our former project designers, who left the firm to earn his Masters in Architecture at the University of Virginia, is a finalist in the “Who’s Next” design contest run by Free Green.

As part of a team of UVA grad students called ReSource 7 (they also offer design services in the Charlottesville area), the design made the top 50 from over 400 overall entries. The next phase of the competition is a public vote, which will be worth 25% of the final judging scores.

The contest challenged designers to create a 1,600 square foot residential design that offers “affordable luxury” and utilizes sustainable and affordable strategies within a practical plan. ReSource 7’s design centers around a “modernist retreat” theme for a couple planning to build a lakeside home.

The group designed a two bedroom, two bath residence that ties the indoor with the outdoor for an open yet intimate space. The “Re-Vive” home design offers flexible studio and guest spaces, which allows the owners – a married couple – to grow within the space should their needs change. Clerestory windows throughout allow the owners to control the abundant natural light within the home, while built-in seating and shelving in a library room add a customized touch to the residence. A greenhouse is built in to the south wall of the kitchen, offering access from the kitchen itself. The seamless meld of the indoor and outdoor is further emphasized by a shaded porch with an outdoor fireplace off the master bedroom and stepped planting beds that nestle a boardwalk path leading to a lakeside deck.

For more information and to vote, view ReSource 7’s entry on Free Green’s website. The deadline to vote is Saturday, January 29, 2011.

ReSource 7's "Re-Vive" Residence - Lakeside (South) View

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01.11.11

Farms with Open Doors: Open Houses (FARMS) this Year

Just a quick note to share the following list of farms that are offering open houses this year as posted by Throughbred Times. Lane’s End Farm, a Blackburn project in Versailles, Kentucky, is offering tours from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily through January 14th. If you own or work at a farm that would like to be included on the list, email copy@thoroughbredtimes.com with your information. I’d welcome your thoughts if you happen to tour Lane’s End or any of the other farms. We designed Lane’s End Farm in collaboration with Morgan Wheelock, the talented landscape architect, as the Farm greatly expanded its operations from 1990 to 1995. However, the design intent – striving to provide as much natural light and ventilation as possible within the barns – remains as important today as it did then.

Lane's End Farm in Versailles, KY

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12.16.10

Capitol Hill Information Hub Project: A Design by Matt at Blackburn Architects

View from the Metro

An intern architect at Blackburn, Matt Himler, who recently graduated from Catholic University, has the opportunity to possibly see one of his school studio projects constructed. This is a rare opportunity for a young designer, so I’d really like to promote his outstanding work by showing it off to all of you.

The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) here in D.C. joined several local business organizations in an effort to enhance the hospitality experience at the Eastern Market Metro Plaza, a metro stop in the Capitol Hill neighborhood on D.C.’s public transit system. In doing so, the group ran a design competition for an information hub/kiosk that will be used to direct visitors to attractions in the area while serving as a local events and news center for residents. Several designs were selected and are now in the comment period, during which the public can provide feedback that will be used to form a recommendation for a final design.

Matt’s project is the custom design/build structure 2: MUTATIO. You can view his and alternative designs on the Capitol Hill Information Hub Project blog.

The swooping design is a play on the glass canopy at several of Metro's entrances

Elevations

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12.08.10

Re-Use Architecture by Chris van Uffelen – Braun Publishing

We just received a copy of Chris van Uffelen‘s new book called Re-Use Architecture from the German publishing house, Braun. This substantial book highlights adaptive reuse projects throughout the world: Blackburn’s New River Bank Barn project is part of the stunning collection.

As van Uffelen asserts, building conversion is more relevant than ever as recycled and eco-friendly solutions are becoming the norm. It’s a gratifying challenge for me to “save” an old barn or convert a worn out structure into something different while paying respect to its former use. I can’t help but appreciate a book that makes showing off these type of projects a mission.

We’ve been fortunate to have received attention for the New River Bank Barn, which was a memorable and exciting project for our firm. I still can’t help but feel proud when I look at the “before” photo of the 1800s bank barn, which was in severe disrepair. Most of the structure was preserved, but re-clad in SIPs panels to provide insulation and structural support. The SIPs panels are sandwiched between the original barn walls and a new board-and-batten exterior. The northeast-facing wall of the original structure was removed entirely and glazed, opening the interior to expansive (and very private) views of the property to the Potomac River. Steel columns were added and wrapped in indigenous fieldstone to support the new glass wall, which was designed with mullions that align with the original frame columns and purlins so that the framework fits aesthetically with the original structure.

Our work could only be done thanks to the owner’s foresight to envision a new future for the old structure. I couldn’t be more pleased to have been given the opportunity to “save” the bank barn, which now hosts gatherings and parties for the owner’s friends and family. Re-Use Architecture is available at Amazon and major book retailers.

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11.05.10

Completed Project – A Final Update on Family Farm in Marshall, Virginia

A few weeks ago, some of my staff and I were able to tour one of our recently completed projects, a new horse barn, arena, and residence (for which we did some renovations) in Marshall, Virginia. Marshall is located in the Northern Virginia piedmont, just outside of the well-known horse communities of Middleburg and Upperville. With beautiful, sloping land, the area is home to several farms, vineyards, and country homes.

The 8-stall barn has a lounge with an office on the second floor and an attached arena for the owner to practice dressage. I’m very pleased with how the new facilities have turned out and hope the owners are too. For more information on the scope of work, please see my previous post. [slideshow]

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09.27.10

Washington Humane Society – Walk for the Animals

Some of my staff attended this year’s Walk for the Animals, an annual dog walk hosted by the Washington Humane Society. The walk encourages DC-area dog owners to take their dog (and themselves) for a stroll around one of DC’s neighborhoods to help raise awareness for the Humane Society.

With the weather in the low 90s on Saturday, I’m sure there was quite a bit of panting and lapping up water! Still, there were (doggie) rewards: vendor handouts such as ice cream and baked goods made especially for our four-legged friends.

Project Manager Daniel Blair, Lisa LaFontaine of the Washington Humane Society, and Ellie Jester (plus Frida, Heine, and Happy)

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09.03.10

Arena Design – Tips and Considerations

Size & Scale

When designing, I’m often concerned about maintaining proper scale and proportion. In equestrian design, arenas in particular pose a challenge simply because they are such large structures. An arena is never small, but since different riding styles determine the amount of space required, it’s important to first understand how much space you need. Once you gauge the room necessary to ride, you may consider some of the following elements to design a proportionate and functional arena.

Lower the Stakes

Arenas of all sizes benefit by lowering the structure within the site. Push the structure into the ground and the visual height is greatly reduced. Typically, I recommend lowering the arena four to five feet into the ground. That way you can create an observation area on one or more sides, that has visibility over a kick wall or fence, with an on-grade entrance from the exterior. The “bird’s eye view” observation area is excellent for spectators and the lowered grade takes full advantage of the site without increasing the structure’s bulk.

If there are several facilities on your site, carefully placing the arena amongst the facilities you have—or the ones you plan to build—can help to break up the arena’s large scale. The slope of the roof is often overlooked in prefabricated arenas; often too-low roofs of these structures offer only a massive, box-like look. If, however, the roof is sloped at five in 12 or greater, the arena can appear smaller and fit more naturally into the landscape. Sometimes you’ll run into zoning or code restrictions with height, so lowering the arena into the ground can literally give you more working room.

Covered vs. Enclosed

Geographic location is everything when considering an enclosed, covered, or open arena. An enclosed arena is probably necessary in cold or windy climates. Roll-up garage doors with translucent or clear panels on all sides of the arena can provide an indoor-to-outdoor feel; just open it up when the weather permits or, alternatively, close it up during inclement weather.

Lighting

We try to take advantage of natural light in all of our designs—from equestrian to residential—because natural light really can’t be beat. A continuous ridge skylight is the most effective method to achieve this, and the technique also increases natural ventilation within the arena. Operable louvers can further contribute to natural light and ventilation while maintaining control as you adjust them accordingly. Any glazing used should be translucent to avoid creating shadows that might confuse a horse. While a large skylight is a more expensive option, various materials can reduce its cost. A naturally lit arena doesn’t rely on electric lights during the day, which is another bonus for horses and riders.

The arena at Glenwood Farm

View from the inside at Glenwood

Arranging the farm to minimize the arena's impact at Winley Farm

An example of an observation/lounge area in a private facility

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