08.25.08

Lighter than Ever

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With energy prices increasing every day, it’s more important than ever to design your barn with intent to maximize its amount of natural light. Not only will careful design consideration reduce your dependence on electricity—saving money and energy—it fosters a healthy environment for you and your animals. I have several techniques that ensure I never take light lightly (excuse the pun).

One of the most effective ways of incorporating natural light into a barn’s design is through a continuous ridge skylight. Typically, this type of skylight runs the length of the barn, commonly down the center aisle, and results in ample natural light throughout the day. Most of my designs allow a barn to run without the use of electric lights during the day, with electric lights serving only as a backup during inclement weather and for nighttime use as needed. 

Other high placed windows, especially around the eaves of the barn, increase natural (and free) lighting even more. These higher placed windows allow the light to reach greater depths of the barn and reduce injury risk since they’re out of the reach of your horses. Still, the use of shatterproof glass is imperative.

For the electric lights you’ll inevitably have (but only occasionally use if the design is right), safety and the type of light are two primary concerns. For lighting in the aisles I tend to favor metal halide, which takes a moment to warm up and functions best in areas that are turned on/off infrequently. The higher up, the more effectively the lights can provide decent light. A three-way switch near end of the aisle can help you control what areas to light, which saves you from turning on lights in the entire barn unnecessarily.

Stall lighting generally uses one switch per stall with a light on each side to counter shadows, which is helpful when working on a horse. A shatterproof lens paired with cage protection is vital for the horses’ safety, and should never be overlooked. Typically, florescent lights are cheaper to operate and carry fewer fire risks than incandescent. While the light fixtures are more expensive—and ballasts may be needed to protect against cold weather—energy-efficient bulbs and fixtures will cut down costs and resource strain in the long run.

 

 

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