06.24.19

Keeping Them Healthy: Thoughts on the Design and Installation of Dry Lots on Horse Farms

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Let’s talk about dry lots. Essential on nearly every equine facility, dry lots vary widely in size, location and construction.

By nature, of course, horses are herd animals evolved to roam and graze on sparse prairies.  We’ve introduced a complete change to the evolutionary process – incorporating diets of grain and lush pastures. The resultant problems are many, but our solution is simple. Limit the horses’ activities or diet as you give them access to open air and light.  

Blackburn recommends dry lots on most, if not all, of the farms we design. Sadly, too many farms have unintentional dry lots because of inadequate pasture management.

Why create a healthy dry lot?
1. Control the horse’s diet.
2. Preserve paddocks thru rotation.
3. Control moisture and its effect on hooves.

Here are nine things to consider:

Location: Choose a place close to the barn for ease of access.  Provide adequate sized gates for horses but also an occasional vehicle.  Select a relatively flat location but one that drains well and isn’t too isolated so horses can socialize but generally remain separated.  

Materials: The footing should be firm but not hard packed.  It must be designed to drain well to allow moisture to either drain thru or away without causing erosion. Sandy soil is preferable but some sort of gravel that is easy on the feet or, even better, an engineered footing similar to your arena should work perfectly. 

Size:  The size can vary, but if you are creating the dry lot to limit the horses’ movement for health reasons, you may want it to be smaller than larger.  We recommend multiple dry lots of varying sizes to accommodate many uses.

Fencing:  It goes without saying that your fencing needs to be sturdy. See Activities below.

Shelters: Some form of shade shelter for fly & weather protection is preferred – by humans, but horses may never darken the interior.

Feeding: Various forms of slow feeders, salt blocks, etc. can be used.  If you are restricting the horse’s diet, we recommend consulting with your vet about setting up a feeding regimen that can be incorporated into your use of the dry lot.

Activities:  Spreading hay rations around the lot encourages movement; toys for activity or human interaction can be very helpful.  We always recommend consulting with your veterinarian because no two horses are the same. You and your vet know what’s best for your horse.

Socialization:  Locating the dry lot close to other horses reduces stress and is more emotionally relaxing.

Footing: The dry lot surface should provide a safe and comfortable footing for horses but it must also drain well.  Therefore, we recommend that the upper surface/footing be 4 to 6 inches of footing material (stone dust, sand, engineered footing material as described above a drainage layer) or possibly 8 to 12 inches of pea gravel, allowing the foot to sink in without undue pressure on sensitive areas.  The drainage layer can be 1/2 inch to 1 inch stones. You can add an interlocking grid within this layer to provide additional stability of the base layer and improve drainage.

Posted in Equestrian News, News and Press |

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